FLL QR CODE SCAN!!

Hello Fellow First LEGO League fans!

Databots Here!

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If you are reading this you must have scanned our team shirts to see where our QR code leads!!!

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Welcome to our Webpage!

Stay a while and have a look around to see how we are helping our Animal Allies

(The Pollinators)

Here you can find information about our project, learn about bees and even find a link to a game on Scratch that can help you learn some bee facts. So if you have some downtime today come a play our game a while, and read about our project.

Click Here to Read About Local Bees and Wasps.

Click Here to See our Project

Click here to see how we are working with the Washington Pavilion.

Click Here for Challenge 1

Click Here for Challenge 2

Click Here to Play a Bee Game on Scratch

BONUS: Also… if you go and find our young siblings wearing bee costumes, buzzing around our booth or in the stands and say.

“Pollinator Power”

They will give you some free glitter anti-glare patches to wear!

Innovation… The Portable Pollinator Education Garden

For our Innovation Project this year we have decided to innovate a new type of movable garden.

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It is different than other gardens because it is on wheels and is designed to travel for the purpose of educating the public about bees and the bee friendly flower they love.

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We specifically designed it to fit through doorways and load easily into a large vehicle. We plan to bring this garden to the following events to teach the public how to help the  dwindling pollinator population.

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Portable Pollinator Garden Events

–         Ag Day at Washington Pavilion, March (2,200 people attend) At this event, where flower seeds will be actively planted in our garden by visitors.

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–         Party for the Planet at Great Plains Zoo, April (In the Hundreds)

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–         Outdoor University at Outdoor Campus, August (4,100 people)

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–         All About Science Festival July (4,000 people attend)

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We plan to educate around 11,000 people this way!

The permanent home for our garden is at the Washington Pavilion near the exit of their education hive. This way we can plant flowers to supplicate their pollen needs in the urban environment downtown where there are not a lot of flower resources available.

This will enable our garden to continue to educate and help, outside of public events.

There’s more here! Check out…

Click Here to Read About Local Bees and Wasps.

Click Here to See our Project

Click here to see how we are working with the Washington Pavilion.

Click Here for Challenge 1

Click Here for Challenge 2

Click Here to Play a Bee Game on Scratch

 

 

Washington Pavilion Observation Hive Help

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This is the Observation Bee Hive at the Washington Pavilion       Kirby Science Discovery Center

– We have been given permission and plan to, place our portable pollinator education garden outside the Pavilion, below the observation hive exit, to help supplement the bee’s food supply in the downtown urban environment.

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– We have been giving permission to update the out of date bee exhibit’s video to tell about our project and how to help bees. The current 45 min video is old and too long for guests to watch.

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– We hope to post new information and QR code links in the article display on the Bee Exhibit  that link to the Databots’ team webpage. The webpage has more information about bees and our project.

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-This updated video and information will be seen by (81,122) visitors per year.

There’s more here! Check out the links below.

Click Here to Read About Local Bees and Wasps.

Click Here to See our Project

Click here to see how we are working with the Washington Pavilion.

Click Here for Challenge 1

Click Here for Challenge 2

Click Here to Play a Bee Game on Scratch

Identify Local Bees, Wasps & Hornets

Bees, Wasps & Hornets

 

Our region is home to many species of stinging insects  ranging from the beneficial honeybee to the wasp.

Primary Species In Our Region

South Dakota’s State Insect

The Honey Bee

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The Honey Bee has stripes on it’s abdomen and a fuzzy thorax. They are not as brightly colored as wasps. You can sometimes spot them by their full pollen pouches. They live in hives. In some states it is illegal to spray a honey bee hive. Even in SD, beekeepers will move them for you to save the dropping numbers of honey bees.

Bald Faced Hornet

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Workers are about 5/8-3/4 inches; queens are 3/4 of an inch long or more. Mostly black in color with a white pattern over its face, bald-faced hornets build paper enclosed, gray aerial nests that are generally found in trees, chimneys, under eaves, or behind siding on your property.

Carpenter Bee

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Carpenter bees range in size from 1/2 to 1 inch long and are distinguishable by their shiny, black abdomen and “hovering” flight pattern.  The adult female carpenter bee uses her chewing mouth parts to bore dime-sized holes into wood to create a 5 to 8 inch long chamber in which to lay her eggs.

Paper Wasp

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Around 1 inch in length, paper wasps are dark brown in color with black wings and yellow markings.  They are often mistaken for yellow jackets as their body coloring is similar.  Nests are found under eaves, behind attic vents, inside outdoor lighting, grills, and other enclosed areas.

Yellow Jacket

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Adult workers are 3/8 to 5/8 inches long, depending on species; queens are generally longer. Yellow Jackets are black in color with yellow markings on the body and prefer to construct their nests in the ground, but can be found in attics, behind walls, inside hollow trees and other landscapes.

Why are they here?

Bees, wasps, and hornets are commonly found every spring and late summer. Their main goal is finding food, so if you see them, that’s what they’re trying to do. In turn they help by pollinating 1/3 of our food supply. Without them there would be less food for us!

 There is a small flurry of activity in the spring as the queens emerge from their overwintering sites to locate new nesting locations and begin developing their populations. In the late summer, that’s when the worker bees and wasps really get active and aggressive. During that time of year, their whole goal is to carbohydrate-load (nectar, pollen, sweets) so they can feed the queen so she can survive the winter to carry on their colony in the spring.  All the other bees/wasps die off in the winter.

Are They Dangerous?

Bees, wasps and hornets are often considered a nuisance pest. While they are capable of causing varying reactions with their stings including mild redness, swelling and even death especially to those with a severe allergy, generally many of them do not harm if not provoked.

There’s more here! Check out the links below!

Click Here to Read About Local Bees and Wasps.

Click Here to See our Project

Click here to see how we are working with the Washington Pavilion.

Click Here for Challenge 1

Click Here for Challenge 2

Click Here to Play a Bee Game on Scratch

Challenge: Plant a Bee Friendly Garden

Want to plant a Bee friendly Garden?

Help our pollinator pals by planting

these “bee favorite” flowers.

Black Eyed Susan

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Cardinal Flower

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Gentian

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Purple Coneflower

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Violet

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Wild columbine

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 There’s more here! Check out the links below!

Click Here to Read About Local Bees and Wasps.

Click Here to See our Project

Click here to see how we are working with the Washington Pavilion.

Click Here for Challenge 1

Click Here for Challenge 2

Click Here to Play a Bee Game on Scratch

Challenge: Build a Bee Hotel

Bee Hotels for Other Bees and Wasps.

  While other non-honey making pollinators are not as popular as the honeybee, they are still valuable for helping 1/3 of our food supply thrive. We can do what we can to help them as well.

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Many of these pollinators don’t live in a hive, but are solitary insects. They need help with habitat too. Find hollow sticks like bamboo, or wooden slices and drill various holes in them with a drill press or drill.

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Fill a wooden box or house with them to give the insects a place to live make sure they are in a place where they can be undisturbed, and near a food source like a flower garden. There are many examples of bee hotels online. Here are a few photos. You can make them big or small.

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There’s more here! Check out the Links Below.

Click Here to Read About Local Bees and Wasps.

Click Here to See our Project

Click here to see how we are working with the Washington Pavilion.

Click Here for Challenge 1

Click Here for Challenge 2

Click Here to Play a Bee Game on Scratch

Databots Trash Trek Project Skit

The FLL theme this year is Trash Trek.  The project challenge focused on trash and how we take care of trash.  We chose milk cartons and specifically recycling milk cartons in our school.  Our team started a milk carton recycling program and has been successfully recycling 400-500 milk cartons per day since early November.

 

255 point robot run at State

The DataBots competed in the state competition this past Saturday. Our team did an amazing job, including a 255 point robot run on our third and final run. This was the highlight of the season and positions us well for the start of the 2015-16 season.

Riding Our Robot

In case you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to ride atop the Databots Mindstorm robot, this video gives you a taste. The video is from a test run we did at the Sioux Falls qualifier on December 6, 2014. Unfortunately we missed getting the key at the end of the run.

Home of the Databots FLL Team